Alfa Romeo

So, I’m over at the shop the other day and there’s an Alfa there. I was glad because I have a secret desire that Chip will branch out into the Italian car world. Checking to see why it was here, I learned that the speedometer, odometer, and oil pressure gauge don’t work. I knew right then that this car would get along well here. I’m sure Chip or Dean will have the proper wiring re-connected in a jiffy and this Alfa can get back to hitting the road. Drive those cars, folks. It’s good for them.

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Audi?

I forget that Chip would know what a scan tool is, or that he’s worked on fuel injection, or that he spent years as a regular dealership mechanic. I’m reminded when something like this Audi 80 shows up at the shop and I find out it’s not someone visiting, that’s it’s a car in for service. So, Chip did some steering work and an alignment on this beauty. I double checked to make sure it didn’t have a Triumph six under the hood, but, nope, it’s just a regular old car, good for regular ol’ driving around.

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Evapo-Rust Evaluation

We tried some Evapo-Rust on some Datsun parts that were rusty. Spoiler — we were pleased. If we had known how pleased we would be, we would have photographed the parts before we put them in the Evapo-Rust so we could show you the difference. Surely, this stuff can’t be new. And, surely someone knows how to make this stuff without buying Evapo-Rust. Granted, all of this reveals more about my own personality than anything else, as I get stuck at “There’s nothing new under the sun” too easily. I suppose it means something that even if I could make it myself, I’d still probably just go buy it already done, just like the guy who pays for 50% coolant and 50% water. Should I be ashamed? I’m not sure and there are other things worth thinking about, so let’s not get stuck. Rusty parts you say? Evapo-Rust is worth a shot.

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A Mighty Fine Soldier

This real Land Rover (real means it actually roves the land) came in because the mice under the hood are tired. We shall be installing a re-built engine. Once done, this truck will most likely head back into the woods somewhere. That’s a real live Power Take Off Winch in the front. No pavement needed. I’m sure the driver wears tweed.
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2002 Porsche Boxster

We keep it quiet, but Chip can work on “new” stuff, too, having made his living as a dealership mechanic for quite a while. The owner of this Boxster knows Chip and wanted all new coolant hoses and new Bilsteins. There are quite a few hoses in a Boxster that carry coolant from the radiators in the front to the motor in the almost-back. I was impressed with the provisions for motor access Porsche made, but getting to everything was still… interesting.

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See the new yellow thing?

Don’t worry, this car has a bumper. It’s remarkable how many things need to be removed to do these two projects. It’s not like changing your air filter.

IMG_0030A little view of just a couple of coolant hoses (the black ones).  They are in the front wheelwell.

They sure do look better with the bumper.

They sure do look better with the bumper.

Patience is a virtue when you’re working on cars.

Hey – Anybody Home?

Where have we been?  Well, we’ve been here, but I had some trouble with the WordPress upgrade from 3.4.whatever to 3.5.  I couldn’t get any pictures to load into the posts.  Not being a techie, I handled this by screaming, cussing, and hitting things.  Then, I waited a long time hoping it would get miraculously better.  Eventually, I read of a possible solution.  I decided to wait some more time, because the solution involved editing a computer code file, which seemed a lot like deciding which bomb wire to cut when I really had no idea.

Anyway, God loves fools and idiots.  It worked.  I’ll finally be showing you the Porsche Boxster that’s been in the shop.

Go hug a computer programmer.  Surely, they are angry and need love.

SU Carb Rebuild

We got an SU carb in recently to rebuild, as it was malfunctioning and flooding.  Chip dismantled it and discovered one float was full of gasoline rather than air.  That’s abnormal.  It apparently seeped through the solder joint on the float.  Chip made sure a new float was included along with a new needle and seat.

TVR 2500

This TVR came in on a tow truck and wouldn’t run.  Turns out it was a victim of a cheap replacement distributor rotor.   We’ve spoken of these before (see this blog post).  If you find one on your car, go ahead and get a new one, as they are problem children.  This particular rotor didn’t have very good tolerances either, so it got loose enough to hit the contacts in the rotor cap.  With a new rotor and cap, the car started and ran very well, thank you very much.